Fact sheets: Specialist Areas

The Bribery Act 2010 (the Act) applies across the UK and all businesses need to be aware of its requirements. The Act includes a ‘corporate’ offence of ‘failure of commercial organisations to prevent bribery’. The defence against this offence is to ensure that your business has adequate procedures in place to prevent bribery. To help ensure this we recommend that, you undertake a risk assessment for your own business and establish appropriate compliance procedures.

Many businesses are now completely reliant on the data stored on their Network Servers, PCs, laptops, mobile devices and cloud service providers or internet service providers. Some of this data is likely to contain either personal information and/or confidential company information.

Many companies are now completely reliant on the data stored on their network servers, PCs, laptops, mobile devices and in the cloud. Some of this data is likely to contain either personal information and/or confidential company information.

Many companies are now completely reliant on the data stored on their network servers, PCs, laptops, mobile devices or in the cloud. Some of this data is likely to contain either personal information and/or confidential company information.

Many companies are now completely reliant on the data stored on their network servers, PCs, laptops, mobile devices or in the cloud. Some of this data is likely to contain either personal information and/or confidential company information.

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) replaced the Data Protection Act and applies from 25 May 2018. Whilst there are similarities between the Data Protection Act and the GDPR, there are some new elements and significant enhancements.

The GDPR requires all organisations that deal with individuals living in a EU member state to protect the personal information belonging to those individuals and to have verified proof of such protection. Failure to comply with the regulation will result in significant fines.

In line with the Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Act 2006, it is a criminal offence to employ anyone who does not have an entitlement to work in the UK, or undertake the type of work you are offering. Any employer who does not comply with the law may face a fine of up to £20,000 per offence. Further, if employers knowingly use illegal migrant labour it could carry a maximum five year prison sentence and/or an unlimited fine.

Small companies, which qualify as ‘micro-entities’, have a choice of accounting standards:
• to use the same accounting standard – FRS 102 – as larger UK companies but using a reduced disclosure regime (section 1A) within the standard, or
• to apply an alternative standard - FRS 105.

A social enterprise entity is a business with primarily social objectives. Any surpluses made are reinvested into the main principle of that entity (or into the community) rather than maximising profit for shareholders. Examples of types of objectives are regeneration of the local environmental area, promoting climate change awareness and training for disadvantaged people.