Fact sheets: Professional Service Firm Factsheets

The Bribery Act 2010 (the Act) applies across the UK and all businesses need to be aware of its requirements. The Act includes a ‘corporate’ offence of ‘failure of commercial organisations to prevent bribery’. The defence against this offence is to ensure that your business has adequate procedures in place to prevent bribery. To help ensure this we recommend that, you undertake a risk assessment for your own business and establish appropriate compliance procedures.

Some employees will often prefer to use their own personal mobile devices to access company networks/systems. However, this is potentially a security loophole which places the organisation at risk from reputational damage and legal proceedings.

Many businesses are now completely reliant on the data stored on their Network Servers, PCs, laptops, mobile devices and cloud service providers or internet service providers. Some of this data is likely to contain either personal information and/or confidential company information.

Many companies are now completely reliant on the data stored on their network servers, PCs, laptops, mobile devices and in the cloud. Some of this data is likely to contain either personal information and/or confidential company information.

Many companies are now completely reliant on the data stored on their network servers, PCs, laptops, mobile devices or in the cloud. Some of this data is likely to contain either personal information and/or confidential company information.

Many companies are now completely reliant on the data stored on their network servers, PCs, laptops, mobile devices or in the cloud. Some of this data is likely to contain either personal information and/or confidential company information.

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) replaced the Data Protection Act and applies from 25 May 2018. Whilst there are similarities between the Data Protection Act and the GDPR, there are some new elements and significant enhancements.

The GDPR requires all organisations that deal with individuals living in a EU member state to protect the personal information belonging to those individuals and to have verified proof of such protection. Failure to comply with the regulation will result in significant fines.

The key advantage of a LLP compared with a traditional partnership is that the members of the LLP (it is very important that they should not be called partners but members) are able to limit their personal liability if something goes wrong with the business, in much the same way as shareholders in a company have always been able to do. Of course anyone lending money to the LLP such as a bank may still require personal guarantees from the members, as they frequently do with directors/shareholders in a company.

Small companies, which qualify as ‘micro-entities’, have a choice of accounting standards:
• to use the same accounting standard – FRS 102 – as larger UK companies but using a reduced disclosure regime (section 1A) within the standard, or
• to apply an alternative standard - FRS 105.

All companies (except certain listed companies) are required to keep a register of people with significant control (PSC register) and, file relevant information at Companies House. This requirement is in addition to those in respect of existing registers.